Netflix for Chromebook

NetflixNetflix is a great video on demand library that streams entertainment goodness to lots of different platforms. On the web it’s usually delivered by the Microsoft Silverlight plugin, which Chromebooks don’t run. However, Netflix have worked with Google to push Netflix over a Chrome specific technology called Native Client (NaCl), so Netflix works great on both x86 and ARM based Chromebooks. Just install the Netflix app from the Chrome Web Store and start rocking.

If you’re a LoveFilm subscriber (UK based), the story is less positive – you can watch trailers, but since Silverlight is also required for streaming TV and movies, you’re out of luck on any Chrome OS device. The good news is that Silverlight is not long for this world. As it gets dropped, Netflix and others who use it for secure streaming will have to find an alternative that we hope will be fully compatible with Chrome OS.

Alternative services

If you’re not tied to a Netflix subscription, some alternative Video On Demand services use Flash rather than Silverlight, and work no problem on Chromebook regardless of your model.

Final Cut Pro for Chromebook

Final Cut Pro is a video production suite, used to produce movies like The Social Network, 500 Days of Summer and 300. It’s not available for Chromebook, but if you’re shooting for Hollywood this probably isn’t the computer for you. However, if you’re editing a home video or preparing some concert footage for upload to YouTube, there are some alternatives you can use.

YouTube Video Editor

YouTube Video Editor
YouTube Video Editor

If you’re uploading to YouTube, you can use the YouTube Video Editor – upload your raw video first, then hop into the editor to add captions, effects and cuts between clips. It’s not hardcore stuff, but if you’re after some basic editing and you’re already using YouTube, it’s a good option.

WeVideo

WeVideo

WeVideo is an online video editor with the usual set of basic features, plus some nice standard background animations you can fill out your movie with (e.g. for transitions). You can also collaboratively edit video, if that tickles your fancy. The downside is that it isn’t free – you’ll need to pay to export more than 15 minutes of video per month.