Audacity for Chromebook

audacity-160pxAudacity is a free and open source audio editor for Windows, Mac and Linux. It’s a great, simple editor for single audio tracks. Although it isn’t available for Chromebook, there are some neat alternatives.

TwistedWave

TwistedWave supports Google Drive, and even looks visually similar to Audacity. However, it’s limited to editing 30 second long clips without an account – you can log in (currently free) to edit clips up to 20 minutes long.

Den Hoopingarner’s MP3 Recorder

Den Hoopingarner’s portfolio contains an excellent option from Chromebook users – a flash widget that records audio, offers trimming, and encodes it to MP3 for download. Very simple and useful. Thank you to a kind commenter for pointing this out!

Den Hoopingarner MP3 Recorder
Den Hoopingarner’s MP3 Recorder

HTML 5 Audio Tool

The HTML 5 Audio Editor from Plucked is an online audio editor derived from parts of Audacity. Since your Chromebook runs the Web Audio API in Chrome, this editor works great – just drag and drop audio and process with some simple effects like normalisation or linear fades.

HTML 5 Audio Editor
HTML 5 Audio Editor

Filezilla for Chromebook

filezillaFilezilla is a popular FTP client (and server) for Windows, OS X, Linux and other platforms. There’s no Chromebook client, but there are some alternatives you can use.

Net2FTP

net2ftp is a web based FTP client. You can just head to the site, input the FTP details you need and start uploading / downloading at will, but bear in mind that you are sharing your username / password and activity with the net2FTP server. Alternatively, if you have a cloud server of your own, you can install net2ftp on it yourself and not share anything with anyone.

net2ftp
net2ftp

Chrome itself

If you’re only looking to download files over FTP, Chrome itself can do this just fine. Just enter your FTP server’s details in the Omnibox like this:

ftp://username:password@full_url_of_ftp_server/folder

… or, for anonymous login, enter details like this:

ftp://full_url_of_ftp_server/folder

Chrome FTP
Chrome FTP

Internet Explorer for Chromebook

Internet Explorer 10Internet Explorer or IE is the default browser on Windows. If you’re looking to use this app on Chromebook to browse the web, the best advice is don’t. Chrome OS is built around the Chrome browser, which you are using to access this website, and it is a lovely replacement for IE.

However, if you need to get access to IE for testing or similar purposes, there is an app for that.

Cloud Internet Explorer

The Cloud Internet Explorer app gives you a short time accessing a remote Windows box running a version of IE (no flash enabled), so you can see how the other half sees your website.

Cloud Internet Explorer
Cloud Internet Explorer: aboutchromebook.comception!

uTorrent for Chromebook

uTorrentNormally, users download a client like uTorrent to download torrents.

jstorrent

jstorrent is a Chrome packaged app for downloading torrents. Although not completely stable, it does appear to be functional, and (as of writing) the only app based solution for downloading torrents.

jstorrent on Chromebook
jstorrent

uTorrent

You can of course run a uTorrent server on a remote machine and use the web interface on Chromebook to manage it, which is what this machine is best at. However, if you have no remote machine, you can install uTorrent server on the Chromebook itself, thanks to this document from Fran├žois Beaufort.

PuTTY for Chromebook

PuTTYPuTTY is a terminal emulator available for Windows, Linux and OS X. While it’s not available for Chromebook, there are some alternatives to check out.

Crosh

If you’re looking for PuTTY you’re probably comfortable with poking around under the hood. Know this – Chrome OS is built on top of Linux, and has a crosh terminal you can use right now. If you’re looking to SSH somewhere or just ping something, it’ll do just fine. You can get to it by just hitting CTRL+ALT+T, which will open a new tab running your terminal.

crosh shell on Chromebook
crosh shell

Secure Shell

If you need something with more power and more features, Google produced the Secure Shell app. It’s only terminal emulation, so you can’t use it to access your local Linux prompt, but if you’re connecting to something remote it’s just what you need.

Secure Shell on Chromebook
Secure Shell

Notepad for Chromebook

NotepadNotepad is the simple, built-in text editor that comes with Windows. It’s great for making quick edits to text files, coding, and making notes. Most of these things are easy to do on Chromebook, with one exception – editing text files. It’s actually kinda hard to edit a text file in local storage and resave it back to local storage. The fastest solution is to upload any text files to your Google Drive, and edit from there – there’s lots of apps for that, and we’ll show you some below.

Text

Text is a native (“v2”) app, so it runs directly on your Chrome OS device, and hence works great offline. It’s a plain and simple text editor – no syntax highlighting yet, but it’s fast and functional.

Text
Text

Writebox

Writebox is a great app to pick up. It’s a text editor in the distraction free style (one document open, wide margins, large line spacing) – it opens and saves text files directly from your Dropbox or Google Drive.

Writebox
Writebox

Google Docs

If you upload a text file into Google Drive and head to drive.google.com, you will be able to open your text file with it. However, you may get a slight frowny face when you realise that it actually creates a separate Google Docs file, and any changes you make will be made there rather than the original .txt file. Therefore, you can use it to open and read files (but not really edit them) and it creates a bit of a mess on your lovely Drive.

Google Docs text
Opening a text file in Google Drive
Google Docs text
Google Docs viewing a (converted) text file

Write Space

Write Space is a full screen, distraction free style editor that works offline. It’s not quite a regular editor – you can’t save files with it, you just copy all the text and paste it somewhere else – but it’s great for making some crucial notes when you’re offline. You can open files using the “Import” function shown below. (For the technical amongst you, it saves your text to HTML5 local storage.)

Write Space editor
Write Space editor

Write Space import text

Scratchpad

Scratchpad is Google’s built-in note taker for ChromeOS, similar to the sticky notes in OS X – you’ll find it in your apps menu. Just start typing, and everything you do saves straight away as a Google Doc file in the root of your Google Drive. Simple! The files save down as regular Google Docs files, so you can edit them either from Docs or from Scratchpad.

Scratchpad
Scratchpad

Drive Notepad

Drive Notepad is a text editor that’s built to open and save text files directly back to Google Drive, which is great – but it’s a bit flaky. Not recommended yet.

Drive Notepad
Drive Notepad, failing

Chrome

Oddly, you can use Chrome itself as a simple text editor. Open up a new tab and type this in the URL field / Omnibox:

data:text/html, <html contenteditable>

You’ll get a very simple, no formatting bit of space to write text in. If you need something super fast that will always work, save this as a bookmark and use it when you’re in a jam.